Post Conference Workshops

October 8, 2017 (09:00 - 18:00)

POW1 - Fascial manipulation for internal dysfunctions.     Book Now
Carla Stecco, Andrea Pasini, Italy


Hall 1, ITC Gardenia - 8 Hours

Workshop Objectives:

       
  • Give the students the means and the knowledges useful to the treatment of the internal dysfunctions.
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  • Theoretical lectures about anatomy, physiology of the inner fasciae
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  • Theoretical and practical lectures about the treatment modalities, the new points, the different disorders, etc.
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  • Practical exercises between students
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  • Treatment of clinical cases

About the Course:

Fascial Manipulation for Internal Dysfunctions offers a new method to resolve the dysfunctions of internal organs. Therapists work on specific points of the trunk wall (container), to restore the peristalsis of the viscera, vessels and glands (contents). Internal organ motility is linked to the autonomic nervous system; this book examines the ganglia of this system in relation to the fasciae that contain them. Fascial Manipulation for Internal Dysfunctions presents a new perspective on internal dysfunctions and provides medical doctors, physiotherapists, chiropractors, osteopaths and other health practitioners with the guidelines for resolving them. This workshop gives an overview about the Fascial Manipulation treatment strategies available for treating internal dysfunctions related to fascial origin.

➽ Download Workshop Flyer


POW2 - Introduction to Dry Needling for Low Back Pain.      Book Now
Jan Dommerholt, USA


Hall 2, ITC Gardenia - 8 Hours

About the Course:

Myofascial trigger points are a common feature of nearly all pain syndromes, including fibromyalgia, and are characterized by persistent pain, loss of function and movement impairments. Treatment may involve manual therapy techniques, including dry needling or injections, correcting biomechanical and postural dysfunction, and restoring normal movement patterns. Dry needling is a skilled intervention that uses a thin filiform needle to penetrate the skin and stimulate underlying myofascial trigger points, muscular, and connective tissues for the management of neuromusculoskeletal pain and movement impairments. Dry needling is a technique used to treat dysfunctions in skeletal muscle, fascia, and connective tissue, and, diminish persistent peripheral nociceptive input, and reduce or restore impairments of body structure and function leading to improved activity and participation.

➽ Download Workshop Flyer


POW3 - Myopain and chronic joint dysfunction of the lower extremity - practical introduction into fascial technique applied to superficial fascia, deep fascia, septa, retinacula and interosseous membrane.    Book Now
Peter Schwind, Germany


Hall 3, ITC Gardenia - 8 Hours

Workshop Objectives:

Practical Introduction into Fascial Technique Applied to Superficial Fascia, Deep Fascia, Septa, Retinacula And Interosseous Membrane

About the Course:

This workshop would relate the practical experience of Peter Schwind, working with fascia to the latest news from the scientific field. Introduction to diagnostic items for the manual evaluation of fascia and membranes for the widespread typology of tissues. Also explore in which ways the fascial system connects the main components of the parietal, visceral, craniosacral, trunk, lower extremity and transitional systems. We will study the topography of the connections in the lower extremity. And we will pay attention to the connections between the torso and the extremities. For the lower extremities: Special emphasis will be given to the distinction between deep fascia of the muscle, intermuscular septa and interosseous membranes.

➽ Download Workshop Flyer


POW4 - Danis Bois Method Fasciatherapy, Fascia and Fibromyalgia.     Book Now
Christian Courraud, Cyril Dupuis, Isabelle Bertrand, France


Hall 4, ITC Gardenia - 8 Hours

Workshop Objectives:

Practical Introduction into Fascial Technique Applied to Superficial Fascia, Deep Fascia, Septa, Retinacula And Interosseous Membrane

About the Course:

Fascia: the web of elastic tissues that covers, links and separates all the different parts of your body and forms the tensional network of the body. It helps to calm and prevent mental, emotional and physical pain, soothes fatigue and stress and puts you back in tune with your body. Fascia is an elastic tissue and is very sensitive to any form of psychological, emotional or physical stress. These tensions often become trapped and can distort your body’s equilibrium, affecting its natural movements and causing pain, tension, functional disorders or joint problems, sometimes at a distance from where the initial issue is. DBM Fasciatherapy responds to the subtle flow of movements present in your body and follows their natural rhythm. It releases these stored tensions, stimulates blood and lymph flow, oils the joints and relaxes muscles – restoring the body’s balance and natural way of doing things.

What are the physical and emotional benefits?

       
  • Pain relief and management
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  • Tension and stress release and management
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  • Improved mobility – internal and external
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  • Better circulation of body fluids, particularly blood and lymph
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  • Better vitality
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  • Feeling generally more relaxed

Which conditions would fasciatherapy be most helpful for?

       
  • Muscle and joint stiffness and pain, including lower back-pain and fasciatis
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  • Lack of mobility
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  • Stress, insomnia, diges ve problems
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  • Anxiety, phobias, panic attacks
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  • Fatigue symptoms
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  • Depressive states and post traumatic stress
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  • Chronic fatigue - including ME
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  • Recovery from surgery or injury
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  • Support for heavy medical treatments
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  • Improving quality of life with chronic coditions
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  • Supports age related issues

➽ Download Workshop Flyer


POW5 - Course on Myofascial Pain Syndrome and Fibromyalgia Syndrome for Patients and Caregivers.    Book Now
James Fricton, Ginevra Liptan,  Rae Marie Gleason, Thomas Gravin-Nielsen and Jacob N. Ablin


Hall 5, ITC Gardenia - 8 Hours

About the Course:

This course is primarily designed for disseminating the knowledge about Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) and Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) among the patients and caregivers. Provides information about the basic physiological background behind the development of MPS and FMS, causes, outcomes and treatment strategies available along with self-help techniques. MPS is a localized so tissue pain syndrome with local pain, referred pain, and trigger points. MPS trigger points can be active (causing the jump sign), latent (a node on the taut muscle, not painful), secondary (becomes painful from over-activity of a different muscle), or as a satellite (becomes active because of a nearby trigger point). It is theorized that MPS is caused by biological factors interacting with nerve pain, along with psychological factors. Suspected MPS causes include trauma to muscles or inter-vertebral discs, inflammatory conditions, myocardial ischemia, over-exercising or under-exercising, poor posture, fatigue, sleep loss, stress, hormonal changes, poor nutrition, intense cooling of the body (such as from sleeping in front of an air conditioner), obesity, and tobacco use. FMS is a generalized soft tissue pain syndrome caused by limbic and/or neuro- endocrine dysfunction. The primary symptoms of FM are widespread pain, fatigue, insomnia, impaired thought processes, altered sensation, poor physical function (including poor balance), oral and ocular problems, headaches, sexual dysfunction, and psychological effects. FM affects daily functioning, quality of life, and relationships. It occurs twice as often in women as in men, has a strong genetic component, appears most often in middle age, and has a greater incidence of occurrence with increasing age. FM tender points are not trigger points; they occur across the entire body and do not have jump signs (patient vocalizing or withdrawing from palpation) or referred pain. Augmented pain and sensory processing occur; patients with FM sense pain more intensely, and stimuli such as sounds, smells, and heat are found noxious at low levels.FM pain is unrelated to, or out of proportion with, any physical damage or inflammation.

➽ Download Workshop Flyer Part 1

➽ Download Workshop Flyer Part 2